Living Cultures of the Woodlands

New for 2016 is the Living Cultures of the Woodlands. For the past two years, our Living Cultures of the Great Lakes area has taken our traditional “villages” tableau to a new level with examples of Native buildings, arts, foods, music and other traditional activities and demonstrations from the tribes of the Great Lakes.

 

This year we are proud to add a similar experience based on the tribes of the Woodlands.  Visitors to Indian Summer will be able to explore several examples of buildings used by the Woodland tribes as well as see demonstrations of beadwork, flute music, several types of basket making, lacrosse and the cultivation of wild rice.

 

Friday, August 9 – Education Day (9am – 2pm)

9:00    Traditional Beadwork Demonstration / Donna Mohawk

10:00  Flute Music / Waylon Shawanokasic

11:00  Hand Drum Music Demonstrations/Music Pete and Waylon Wynos

12:00  Black Ash Basket making / Leola Rockman

1:00    Sweet Grass Basket making Sandy and Marcy Zhuckkahosee

2:00   Lacrosse Stick making / John Teller

 

Friday, September 9

5:00   Wild Rice / Mike Wiggins

6:00   Hand Drum demonstrations and music / Pete and Waylon

7:00   Sweet grass basket making / Sandy and Marcy

8:00   Donna Mohawk Traditional Beadwork

9:00   Flute Music / Waylon Shawanokasic

 

Saturday, September 10

12:00  Black Ash Basket making / Leola Rockman

1:00    Sweet Grass Basket making Sandy and Marcy

2:00    Lacrosse Stick making / John Teller

3:00    Donna Mohawk Traditional Beadwork

4:00    Hand Drum Music Demonstrations/Music Pete and Waylon

5:00   Wild Rice / Mike Wiggins

7:00   Sweet grass basket making / Sandy and Marcy

8:00   Donna Mohawk Traditional Beadwork

9:00   Flute Music / Waylon Shawanokasic

 

Sunday, September 11

12:00  Ash Basket making / Leola Rockman

1:00    Sweet Grass Basket making Sandy and Marcy

2:00   Lacrosse Stick making / John Teller

3:00   Donna Mohawk Traditional Beadwork

4:00   Sweet grass basket making / Sandy and Marcy

5:00   Donna Mohawk Traditional Beadwork

6:00   Flute Music / Waylon Shawanokasic

 

Living Cultures of the Great Lakes Demonstrators

 

Leola Rockman – Menominee and Ho Chunk  has been working with the Ash Baskets for many years. Her unique style and creativity brings out the traditional style that represents her people very well. Her baskets have appeared nationwide, and appear every year at the Inter Tribal Timber Council annual meetings all over the United States. Her work also has been displayed with current Senators and state elected officials. It is an honor to have Ms. Rockman as part of the Indian Summer Festivities although her life has been a life of living with a disability she has never let that interfere with her remarkable and superior products that she produces.

 

Waylon Shawanokasic – A remarkable young Menominee man who has taken it upon himself to learn the traditional ways of spiritual music and respect for his people. Born and raised on the Menominee Indian reservation he comes from a long line of full blooded Menominee relatives. His speaking ability as well as his love for the music and language is an asset for his family and tribe. He frequently appears at traditional gatherings and compliments the activities that he is associated with.

 

Marcia Zhuckkahosee/Sandra (Draghi) Zhuckkahosee – Menominee and Kickapoo  have been raised on the Menominee Indian Reservation in what is known as Crow settlement. They bring to Indian Summer Festival their rich culture and unique style of Sweet grass basket weaving and contemporary use of the lands that they have been raised with. The respect for the lands and the resources is a proven fact that these native women can hand down their abilities to the younger generation and will always be admired through the work produced.

 

Merwin Wynos (Pete Thunder) – Menominee Tribal member and fluent speaker sits on the Big Drum in Zoar Wis and has connected the community spiritually and traditionally from singing traditional songs to the use of our abundance resources on Menominee. He comes from a long line of fluent speakers and well respected community religions with in the community. He has incorporated these same qualities in to his family that were handed down from generations of a traditional aspect. His ability to use and design the hand drum and sing with his family speaks for itself as you will see in his demonstrations at the Indian Summer Festival.

 

Donna (Mohawk) Bucholz – A member of the Stockbridge Munsee Band of Mohican Indian cherishes her hard work and exceptional product and creations in terms of her beadwork styles. Donna comes from a traditional family that encompasses the value of the land and the languages taught by her people. Donna has been working with the traditional crafts for many years and her products have been admired by many tribal leaders in Indian Country. She continues to teach her children as well as her grandchildren the respect and the significance of her work and the importance of this unique ability.

 

Mike Wiggins – A member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians brings to the Indian Summer Festival grounds his unique styles of gathering and acknowledging the Wild Rice and Maple Syrup traditions. His long history of gathering in the Lake Superior region reveals and exhibits the ability to maintain the traditional ways of how his tribe has done for many years. A former tribal elected official enhances his knowledge and understanding and respect for many tribes from across the United States.

 

Daniel Shawanokasic, a Menominee tribal member who has been working with and gathering from the Menominee land all his life and has the utmost respect for lands that he was raised on. Daniel was raised in Crow Settlement on the Menominee Indian Reservation, his father belonged to the Thunderer Clan and his name translated in to the English language means Southern Sky. He is the youngest of many children and his Indian name is Namutasaeh which means (Little Brother).

Daniel uses the smudging and fires for his offerings to the Great Spirit in return for a holistic and wellness approach for his family and also a resource to help with in the Indian communities.